TV

New short film with Adrien Brody for the 60 years of Fiat 500.

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New short film with Adrien Brody for the 60 year of Fiat 500.

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The short film will be air this evening on Rai, Mediaset, Sky and Discovery his first short film, which will also be visible on YouTube in a longer version.

Fiat christened their first short movie to celebrate the 500th birthday: “See you in the future”.

The spot, filmed by Leo Burnett, is set in Milan in the 1960s and plays on the contrast between elements of that period and our days. The spot will be broadcast on YouTube in a 4-minute long version. Directed by Ago Panini while the production is from Movie Magic International. Planning is both off-line and online with Starcom.

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Peaky Blinders creator has revealed some details on Adrien Brody.

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Adrien Brody’s role in ‘Peaky Blinders’ revealed.

Peaky Blinders creator Steven Knight has revealed some details on Adrien Brody and Aidan Gillen’s roles in the fourth series.

Peaky Blinders creator Steven Knight broke some surprising news a while back when he revealed that two new heavy hitters were climbing aboard for season 4 of the Birmingham-set show. Game Of Thrones’ Aiden Gillen and decidedly-more-American Pianist award-winner Adrien Brody were both announced as brand new cast members for the forthcoming run, but until now we didn’t know who they might be playing, or what their part in the Shelbys’ saga might be.

Adrien Brody is set to play Thomas Shelby’s “biggest threat” in the forthcoming new season of Peaky Blinders, creator Steven Knight has revealed: “Adrien plays the threat to the family and possibly the biggest they’ll face”.

But he was quick to play down the casting choices as a ratings-grabber. “We have been very fortunate to get two really legendary actors. We get a lot of actors who want to be part of [Peaky Blinders] which is great but we try not to make it a ‘spot the star’ sentiment, and just get actors who are really perfect for the role.”

Knight was then quizzed about whether Tommy (Cillian Murphy) would find it easy to make it up to the rest of the family after the season three’s explosive cliffhanger, but he wasn’t about to spoil any of that.

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[Photos] Adrien Brody is back with guns on the set of Peaky Blinders fourth season.

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Fans of Peaky Blinders are desperately awaiting the fourth season, which is currently in production in various locations around the UK.
But until then, sneak peeks from the set will have to suffice; the latest of which is sure to please die hard followers.

The new co-star Adrien Brody was also spotted pointing a deadly weapon – he is new to the show and his character’s name is as yet unknown.

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Adrien arriving at the set for his scenes on location of Peaky Blinders.

On set!


Source: dailymail

Adrien Brody joins ‘Peaky Blinders’ Season 4.

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EXCLUSIVE: Oscar winner Adrien Brody will be joining the cast of “Peaky Blinders” Season 4.

The filming started this week.

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It’s unclear what character he’ll play, as it’s currently being kept under wraps, but creator Steven Knight says

“He genuinely was the actor in my head when I wrote the part. I’m sure he will be a formidable presence in the world of the Peaky Blinders.”

Of Brody’s casting, BBC Drama Controller Piers Wenger said he is

“a world class actor famous for producing mesmerizing performances. I cannot wait to see him in action alongside the rest of Peaky Blinders‘ superb cast bringing Steven Knight’s extraordinary writing to life on BBC Two.”

First look:

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Season four will pick up when “Tommy Shelby (played by Cillian Murphy) receives a mysterious letter on Christmas Eve and realizes the Peaky Blinders are in danger of annihilation. As the enemy closes in, he flees his country house and returns to the streets of Small Heath, Birmingham where a desperate fight for survival begins,”

The role has been kept secret, so it is still unclear what role Brody will play in the epic gangster saga.

Adrien is the star of blockbusters films Midnight in Paris, The Grand Budapest Hotel and hit TV miniseries Houdini so his intense acting skills are destined to fit well in to Peaky Blinders.

Peaky Blinders has began filming series four in Liverpool earlier this week and fans of the BBC drama will be wondering when they can see it on screen.

Season four of Peaky Blinders is set to premiere later this year or 2018.

//Credits

Source: deadline

 

Adrien Brody Talks playing himself on ‘Dice’ and Saving the Rainforest With Leo DiCaprio.

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Best Actor Oscar-winner Adrien Brody talks about how he ended up playing a ridiculous version of himself on Andrew Dice Clay’s Showtime series.

Adrien Brody is not exactly known for his comedy. The 43-year-old actor, who won an Academy Award for his performance as an emaciated, Chopin-playing Holocaust survivor in The Pianist, is deadly serious about his craft. Which makes him the perfect foil for Andrew Dice Clay in tonight’s episode of Showtime’s Dice.
With no warning or rationale, Brody pops up in the show’s second episode with a mission: to study and subsequently “become” Andrew Dice Clay. As he explains in the opening scene, he is preparing to star in an off-Broadway play that focuses on “masculinity.” As a “method actor,” he wants to follow Clay around and learn what makes him tick, a proposition that is flattering at first but ultimately deeply disturbing.

Before the episode airs Sunday night on Showtime, Brody spoke to The Daily Beast about how he ended up playing himself for the first time ever on Dice and discussed his not-so-secret love of comedy. Believe it or not, he took the whole thing very seriously.

Below is an edited and condensed version of our conversation.

How did you end up playing yourself on Dice?

They created the concept in the screenplay and they assumed I’d find it as funny as they did. And I did. And you know, I’m a fan of [Andrew Dice Clay] and I thought, what an interesting idea. It’s a very complex way of playing a character, because I’m creating a character of myself and at the same time creating an interpretation of him and playing it from the perspective of myself. And all of that is just so funny to play with. Also, because I’m very serious about my work, it’s an opportunity for me to do a broader comedy, which I love and appreciate. But it was also a chance to poke fun at a certain perception of how I might be.

Is this the first time you’ve played yourself on screen?

That’s a good question. Probably. There may have been one time — I don’t think so, actually, this might have been it.

So, what considerations did you make about how you wanted to portray yourself?

Well, we didn’t change anything really [in the script]. We enhanced it by having a lot of improvisation and a playfulness of how we both interpreted ourselves. Dice is also playing a character, playing a version of himself, not entirely himself. And it’s about that dance. He’s wonderful to act with.

What was your relationship, if any, with Andrew Dice Clay before this?

We may have seen each other or bumped into each other somewhere, but I didn’t know him at all. I loved his earlier stand-up bits growing up, when I was in high school. I remember running the cassette tape of his into the ground, I just thought he was hilarious, as did most of my adolescent friends. He’s a really great guy and was really fun to collaborate with and we’re friends now, so that’s cool.

As you said, you’re not known for comedy, which makes this performance so surprising. Did it spark in you a desire to do more comedy moving forward?

Well, I’ve always had it. The odd thing is how, I think, the intensity and devotion to my craft and the intensity of certain performances or types of roles I’ve played overshadow the comedic stints that I’ve had. Darjeeling Limited is a comedy, The Brothers Bloom is a comedy. I’ve done myriad smaller independent films. Dummy, which is a wonderful film that I did with Vera Farmiga years ago. Playing Dalí in Midnight in Paris is a comedic turn. The issue is, it’s a perception thing. I love comedy and I think it’s so much fun. There are different challenges and it requires a similar kind of focus. But there are levels of freedoms in it that are not often afforded to me in a more serious dramatic role.

In the show, you describe yourself as a “method actor” and that’s why you’re following Dice around, to learn from him. Is that the type of thing you’ve done for actual movie roles in the past?

Yeah, sure, that’s one aspect of it, but I’ve done many things to help create a transformation that is authentic to me. The more I have a sincere connection to something, the less acting is required. And the more it’s about creating the space to feel that connection and to feel that shift from yourself. And start interpreting things through new eyes. And the only way to do that for me is through quite a bit of work and research and associations from another perspective. And really living that for a period of time, like a meditation. You start to be able to key into things, like a way of responding that’s instinctual to a character and not your own instincts. It’s necessary. Some roles require less and some roles require a great deal of commitment.

Can you think of one role that stands out to you that you did a ton of that kind of research for?

I’ve done it across the board on many films. The Pianist would be a perfect example, where I taught myself to play Chopin and simultaneously lost a tremendous amount of weight and inundated myself with historical details of the time. And omitted all modern music in my life and sold my car and put my stuff in storage and disconnected my phone. It was very extreme and I was able to do that at that point in my life, but I basically had nothing comforting to return to or dream of. They were gone. I basically disconnected and reconnected in that phase as that character. And then had to slowly try to climb back into my life, which took a long time.

That obviously paid off in terms of awards, winning you the Best Actor Oscar. Your friend Leonardo DiCaprio finally won an Oscar this year. Have you given him a hard time about beating him to it by 13 years?

[Laughs.] Definitely not. No, I’m very happy for him. We just spent time in Sumatra fighting the deforestation in the rain forest there. And I was fortunate to get to experience that and learn about the impact on the biodiversity of that region. And I admire all of those efforts that he makes and try to do my share as well.


Source: The Daily Beast

Exclusive clip from Showtime’s Dice with Adrien Brody.

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See Adrien Brody and Andrew Dice Clay in a new clip from the next episode of  Dice, which airs Sunday, April 17, at 9:30 p.m. EST on Showtime channel.

Clip on tweet:

 

 

 

Credit via: ew.com

Adrien Brody, Lorraine Bracco Cast on Andrew Clay’s “Dice” Showtime Sitcom.

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Actor Adrien Brody and Lorraine Bracco have both signed on to guest star on Andrew Clay‘s new Showtime sitcom “Dice”.

Brody will guest star in one episode playing himself, while Bracco will appear in two episodes as Toni, a Vegas overlord who owns Clay’s gambling debts.

Sean Furst, Bryan Furst, Bruce Rubenstein, Clay and Armstrong serve as executive producers. Fox21 Television Studios is producing, with production to begin this month for a premiere in 2016.


El actor Adrien Brody y Lorraine Bracco han firmado para ser estrellas invitadas en la nueva comedia de Showtime de Andrew Clay “Dice”.

Brody será estrella invitada en un episodio interpretándose a sí mismo, mientras que Bracco aparecerá en dos episodios.

Sean Furst, Bryan Furst, Bruce Rubenstein, Clay y Armstrong son los productores ejecutivos. Fox21 Television Studios está produciendo. La producción ya ha comenzado y su estreno está previsto para el 2016.

 

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Credits: The Wrap / Spanish by: Liss – brodyfansite

 

Adrien Brody will narrate one episode of National Geographic Channel’s “Breakthrough”.

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Adrien Brody will narrate one episode of National Geographic Channel’s “Breakthrough”.

“Breakthrough” specifically focuses on discoveries in brain science, longevity, water, energy, pandemics and cyborg technology.

The episode is: “Decoding the Brain” (Directed by Brett Ratner; Narrated by Adrien Brody)

Premieres November 15.

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(Via: The Wrap)

Adrien Brody conjures his magic childhood in ‘Houdini’: “I was more than a fan” – Emmys

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As the youngest man ever to win a leading actor Academy Award (aged 29 for The Pianist, 2003), Adrien Brody has since then pretty much pleased himself when it came to choosing projects. In the case of his 2015 Emmy-nominated role in History’s Houdini, Brody had a genuine, personal passion for the fabled magician, having admired him since childhood. Growing up in Queens, Brody would put on his own magic shows as “The Amazing Adrien.”

“I was more than a fan,” Brody says. “Not only did I have a fascination with magic, but I had aspirations of becoming a magician when I was a boy.”

Of his Emmy nom for the role, Brody says, “receiving recognition for a heroic figure in my life and for something as meaningful as magic for it to have led me into acting and then led me to ultimately play the key figure in that world is pretty remarkable.”

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“Not only did I have a fascination with magic,” Brody says, “but I had aspirations of becoming a magician when I was a boy.”

Interestingly, Brody experienced parallels between the process of acting and working in magic. “You understand the workings of a trick and you make it your own, you develop a patter and you tell that story uniquely, and that’s what makes a great show and a great magician.”

The Houdini role itself was a physical one, involving hanging upside down immersed in water. “The underwater work was particularly challenging,” Brody says, “because it required emotion underwater in confined spaces and completely inverted, which is a very different breathing process and your lung capacity feels different. There’s both physical and psychological pressure. You’re unable to turn around unless you turn around in one specific way–it’s too narrow of a compartment, so you can very easily get wedged and yet you have to hold your breath as long as possible in order to get the shot in too.”

Add to the water chamber the experience of hanging from a crane, suspended by the ankles in a straitjacket. “I’d been fortunate enough to not dislocate my shoulder,” Brody says, “but there’s a lot of struggling in the process.”

But Brody felt well-protected during production and wasn’t concerned about his wellbeing. “That’s not a focal point for me,” he says. “I mean, I think it unfortunately comes with the territory if there’s something like that. But things go wrong and we know that and you hope for the best and you try to prepare.”

Brody currently has several projects in the works. His latest, Septembers of Shiraz, was recently accepted to Toronto. “It’s a beautiful film that I feel grateful to have participated in,” he says. “It’s about the struggles of the people in Iran who were taken in and abducted by the Revolutionary Guard during the fall of the Shah and the regime change there.”

Brody is also co-writing and producing a romantic comedy with his company, Fable House. He says, “it’s a continuation of being able to put a lifetime of what I love about the work and then find an innovative approach that is exciting. It’s a very exciting time for me in a creative capacity.”

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Source: deadline.com